Army fires six active-duty commanders, including two battalion commanders, for refusing COVID vax

Army fires six active-duty commanders, including two battalion commanders, for refusing COVID vaccine: Nearly 3,000 reprimands issued to soldiers for refusing the shot

The United States Army announced that they’ve relieved six active-duty commanders of their duties for refusing to take the COVID-19 vaccine. 

Commanding officers in the Army can include captains and lieutenant colonels rising up toward generals. 

There are about 57,000 people serving at the level of captain or above in the US Army, meaning around 0.01 percent of commanding officers were dismissed for not getting the jab. 

There are about 481,000 active duty officers in the Armed Forces, making those fired 0.001 percent of all currently on active duty.   

The Army did not specify the rank of each of the dismissed officers, though they said the dismissals included two battalion commanders.

Over 96 percent of active-duty soldiers in the US Armed Forces have been fully vaccinated against the virus and over 97 percent partially vaccinated

Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin has mandated the vaccinations but left it up to each military branch to set a deadline

Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin has mandated the vaccinations but left it up to each military branch to set a deadline

In addition, the Armed Forces has issued 2,994 written reprimands to soldiers for refusing the COVID-19 vaccine out of the 3,611 troops who have refused the shot.   

These punishments are for refusing what they describe as a lawful order by Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin mandating that all soldiers receive the coronavirus jab. 

The US Army has yet to begin separating soldiers who refuse the vaccine but expects to get further guidance on the issue later in January.  

The military remains well ahead of the general population in terms of vaccinations.

Over 96 percent of active-duty soldiers in the US Armed Forces have been fully vaccinated against the virus and over 97 percent partially vaccinated. Army reserves remain at about 73 percent fully vaccinated.

As of January, boosters are not required to be considered ‘fully vaccinated’ and comply with the Pentagon’s COVID-19 rule, though the Pentagon is said to be considering a booster mandate.

Austin’s mandate left the deadline for full vaccination up to each branch of the military. The Army chose December 15.  

The Army has yet to grant any of the 2,128 religious exemption requests its received, in line with the Navy, Air Force and Marines who have also not granted any requests for religious exemptions to date. 

Only 162 of those requests have been fully disapproved by the Army, so that number is subject to change.  

The Armed Forces has granted five permanent medical exemptions for vaccination out of 653 requests to date.  

The Navy currently has 5,209 active-duty soldiers unvaccinated, as they have begun separation of soldiers for refusals.   

The Army National Guard remains the only branch of the Army that still has time to take the shot, with a June 30 deadline.    

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *