Bali’s Canggu beach covered in debris and waste as island welcomes back Australian tourists

Depressing pictures show debris and plastic waste scattered across popular Bali beach just weeks after tourists returned to holiday hotspot

Shocking photos of the unsightly state of one of Bali’s much-loved beaches have emerged just weeks after the holiday island welcomed back international tourists, including flocks arriving from Down Under.

Canggu’s once pristine shoreline is strewn with debris, rubbish and plastic waste following the annual monsoon season.

An influx of thousands of holidaymakers flocking back to the popular tourist hotspot following two years of closed borders due to Covid-19 have added to the problem.

Photos of Canggu this week show the beach resembling more like a rubbish tip than the idyllic beach it’s known for.

Tourists, locals and dogs are pictured surrounded by mountains of debris and plastic waste discarded by beachgoers and washed up onto the shore. 

Tourists walk along Bali Canggu beach scattered with debris and discarded plastic waste

This is what Canggu beach looked like on Tuesday, six months out from Bali welcoming world leaders for the G20 Summit

This is what Canggu beach looked like on Tuesday, six months out from Bali welcoming world leaders for the G20 Summit

Much of the trash will end up back in to ocean due to Bali having no centralised waste management system. 

Photos of the same beach taken just 18 months ago show locals and expats enjoying the pristine shoreline without the influx of tourists.

Up to 60 tonnes of trash is being collected from Bali’s beaches every day with the problem at its worst from December to March each year, where seasonal winds and heavy rain wash up rubbish onto the beaches.

Bali’s Kuta beach had the same problem early last year, despite the island being off-limits to international tourists.

There are growing calls for the issue to be addressed and return beaches to their pristine best ahead of Bali hosting world leaders at the G20 Summit in November.

It comes less that five years after Bali declared ‘garbage emergency’ across a 6km stretch of coast that included popular beaches Jimbaran, Kuta and Seminyak.

Canggu's once pristine beach looked much different in September 2020 (pictured)

Canggu’s once pristine beach looked much different in September 2020 (pictured)

The return of of travellers has been partly blamed for the trash problem on Bali's beaches

The return of of travellers has been partly blamed for the trash problem on Bali’s beaches

A US expat living in Bali recently posted a video showing grey, filthy grey water spewing onto the beach at trendy Seminyak and rubbish being washed onto popular Kuta Beach.

The footage shows hundreds of items of discarded plastic, including drinking straws, pack rings, and an old tyre on the beach.

A local river near Seminyak also ‘turned red’ because of dyes from clothes making businesses for tourists being dumped in the water.

‘Any influx of people overburdens [Bali’s] already overflowing waste infrastructure,’ she told Daily Mail Australia last month.

Indonesia is the second biggest polluting county in the world and produces 130,000 tons of solid and liquid waste each day

Canggu beach is scattered with washed up debris and plastic cups discarded by tourists

Canggu beach is scattered with washed up debris and plastic cups discarded by tourists

Canggu beach resembles more like a rubbish tip than the idyllic beach it's known for

Canggu beach resembles more like a rubbish tip than the idyllic beach it’s known for

Local environmental group Zero Waste Centre says half of the waste will end up in landfills while the rest will be burned or illegally dumped and bleed into the ocean. 

‘Bali’s trash problem is getting worse day by day,’ the group posted recently.

‘We look forward to the seriousness of the government in dealing with this Bali’s trash problem. It will be a major challenge.’

Pre-Covid, more than a million Australians travelled to Indonesia each year and made up more than a quarter of Bali tourists.

Around 1.23 million Australians visited Bali in 2019 – a rise of 5.24 per cent on 2018 figures.

Around 20,000 Australians visited Bali at any one time before the pandemic before the number of foreign tourists arriving in Indonesia plunged 60 per cent in March as the outbreak spread worldwide.

Thousands of Australians have flocked to Bali since the borders reopened on March 14. 

The trash problem on Bali's beaches isn't a new issue. Pictured is Kuta Beach in January 2021 during the annual monsoon season

The trash problem on Bali’s beaches isn’t a new issue. Pictured is Kuta Beach in January 2021 during the annual monsoon season

Zero Waste Centre says Bali's trash problem is getting worse (pictured Kuta Beach in 2021)

 Zero Waste Centre says Bali’s trash problem is getting worse (pictured Kuta Beach in 2021)

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk

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