Catholic schools in Sydney establish Covid vaccination hubs for kids as young as 5

Covid vaccine clinics are set up in SCHOOLS to get kids as young as 5 jabbed before term starts

Schools are rushing to get students vaccinated before the start of term, as Covid cases continue to soar across Australia, with some even setting up pop-up clinics on campus.

Sydney Catholic Schools has joined forces with the South East Sydney Local Health District to set up two vaccination hubs so that children as young as five can get the jab.

The Pfizer vaccine is approved for use in kids aged 5-11 and the pop-up clinics at Marcellin College Randwick and St Patrick’s College Sutherland, will be set exclusively for primary school students.

Sydney Catholic Schools has joined forces with the South East Sydney Local Health District to set up two vaccination hubs so that children as young as five can get the jab. Pictured: A child receives a Covid jab in Sydney

A vaccine clinic will be set up at St Patrick's College Sutherland

A vaccine clinic will be set up at Marcellin College Randwick

The Pfizer vaccine is approved for use in kids aged 5-11 and the pop-up clinics at Marcellin College Randwick and St Patrick’s College Sutherland, will be set exclusively for primary school students

Executive Director of Sydney Catholic Schools, Mr Tony Farley, said hosting the vaccinations at the schools, instead of chemists, doctors surgeries and mass hubs, may make it a bit less daunting for kids and parents to get the shot.

 ‘I hope that setting up these clinics will give parents the comfort and confidence of a familiar location and community approach to access vaccination,’ he said.

‘Our schools are places of safety and certainty and the close collaboration between our staff, parents and students is the key to meeting and overcoming any challenges in the future.’ 

The vaccination clinic will run from January 18-21 in the first round and then reopen eight weeks later so children can receive their second dose.

Bookings can be made through the NSW Health website.

The development comes after Thursday’s national cabinet meeting where Scott Morrison announced some key workers including teachers will no longer have to isolate if they are a close contact of a positive case and have returned a negative RAT result.

The vaccination clinic will run from January 18-21 in the first round and then reopen eight weeks later so children can receive their second dose. Pictured: Marcellin College Randwick

The vaccination clinic will run from January 18-21 in the first round and then reopen eight weeks later so children can receive their second dose. Pictured: Marcellin College Randwick

Executive Director of Sydney Catholic Schools, Mr Tony Farley, said hosting the vaccinations at the schools instead of chemists, doctors surgeries and mass hubs, may make it a bit less daunting for kids and parents to get the shot. Pictured: A child receives a Covid jab in Sydney

Executive Director of Sydney Catholic Schools, Mr Tony Farley, said hosting the vaccinations at the schools instead of chemists, doctors surgeries and mass hubs, may make it a bit less daunting for kids and parents to get the shot. Pictured: A child receives a Covid jab in Sydney

Scott Morrison said it is a top priority to keep schools open as Covid cases soar. Pictured: St Patrick's College Sutherland

Scott Morrison said it is a top priority to keep schools open as Covid cases soar. Pictured: St Patrick’s College Sutherland

The Prime Minister says reopening schools must be a priority as the nation eclipsed 150,000 Covid cases in a single day on Thursday.

About 10 per cent of the workforce is currently off the job due to isolation requirements.

Mr Morrison said the problem is likely to get worse if the start of the school year is delayed at the end of the month – as Queensland and South Australia have decided to do. 

‘If schools don’t open, that can add an additional five per cent of absenteeism in the workforce,’ the prime minister said.

‘It is absolutely essential for schools to go back safely and remain safely open if we are not going to see any further exacerbation of the workforce challenges we are currently facing.  

‘Schools open means shops open. Schools open means hospitals are open. It means aged care facilities are open. It means essential services and groceries are on the shelves.’  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk

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