LBC host Nick Ferrari faces backlash for saying he is a ‘person of colour’ during debate on racism

LBC radio host Nick Ferrari has sparked a backlash after saying he is a ‘person of colour’ during a debate with a black caller about racism. 

The presenter was hosting segment on his show in response to reports than NHS leaders are being offered courses on ‘micro-aggression’ behaviour amid claims they are worse than ‘overt acts of hate’ 

The course, slammed as a professionalisation of wokery’ and a waste of taxpayers cash, taught how microagressions are statements that are perceived as indirect or unintentional discrimination, like being asked ‘where are you from?’ or ‘are your family cleaners?’

During the discussion with Mike Bankole, a race and representation researcher at King’s College London, Mr Ferrari dismissed the impact of such behaviour, saying he has suffered with so called ‘microaggressions.

He  said he had been asked a number of times where he was from because of his surname. He said: ‘Is it offensive to ask where you’re from? Should I have been offended since about the age of 12?’

Mr Bankole said it was an offensive question to ‘people of colour’, to which Ferrari replied: ‘Well, I am of colour, of course, because I’m white, white is a colour.’   

White LBC radio host Nick Ferrari (pictured) has told a black researcher that he is a ‘person of colour’ in a ‘bizarre’ exchange yesterday

Mr Ferrari had Mike Bankole (pictured) on LBC to talk about NHS leaders being offered non-mandatory 'woke' courses and maintained 'white is a colour' when he was disagreeing with the PHD student

Mr Ferrari had Mike Bankole (pictured) on LBC to talk about NHS leaders being offered non-mandatory ‘woke’ courses and maintained ‘white is a colour’ when he was disagreeing with the PHD student

PHD researcher on race, racism, and political representation at Kings College London Mike Bankhole later said on Twitter: 'Nick Ferrari just tried to convince me that, as a white man, he is person of colour. How’s your morning going?'

PHD researcher on race, racism, and political representation at Kings College London Mike Bankhole later said on Twitter: ‘Nick Ferrari just tried to convince me that, as a white man, he is person of colour. How’s your morning going?’

On the LBC show, Mr Ferrari started off by asking if Mr Bankhole agreed with British campaigner’s Nova Reid – who ran the NHS courses – on her theories on microaggressions. 

She previously said that this ‘hidden racism’ can be worse than ‘overt acts of hate’.

The Hertfordshire author and former actress also said statements such as these can cause PTSD. 

In response to Mr Ferrari, Mr Bankole said both overt and covert racism was wrong but the ‘problem with microaggressions’ are they are ‘harder’ to call out. 

‘They are so insidious and so difficult to call out’, he added. ‘The main issue is racism in all guises is deeply harmful.’

Mr Ferrari said: ‘Is it offensive to ask where you’re from, should I be offended from the age of 12. 

‘I’ve got a very strange last name to British people, so they’re going to say where am I from.’

One the LBC show, Mr Ferrari (pictured today) started off by asking if Mr Bankhole agreed with British campaigner's Nova Reid - who ran the NHS webinar - on her theories on microaggressions

One the LBC show, Mr Ferrari (pictured today) started off by asking if Mr Bankhole agreed with British campaigner’s Nova Reid – who ran the NHS webinar – on her theories on microaggressions

Mr Bankole said: ‘The reason people of colour are asked where they’re from is to question their Britishness’. 

Mr Ferrari said: ‘Well, I am of colour, of course, because I’m white, white is a colour. But why the problem?’ 

‘Am I not a person of colour if I’m white?

Mr Bankole said: ‘A person of colour is often used to refer to racial minorities, Nick, and you know that. You’re a white man, Nick.’

‘So white isn’t a colour for you, Michael?’ Ferrari asked.

He went on to say: ‘Why didn’t you just say racial minorities? I don’t understand why you don’t use that expression.’

Mr Ferrari then asked how ‘widespread’ microaggressions are across the NHS. 

And Mr Bankhole said he would use the term ‘racial minorities’ to talk about the microaggressions people face and said the NHS should have a complaints system so doctors and nurses can flag when this happens. 

A caller later came onto criticise Mr Ferrari and say he was ‘not a person of colour’ as he is white.  

On Twitter Anthropologist and author Will Black tweeted: ‘Nick Ferrari isn’t ‘a person of colour’.

He added: ‘The problem of being ‘of colour’ isn’t the colour but how people are treated as a result of their skin colour — and the rigged system that perpetuates racism.’

Former BBC Entertainment commissioner Sohail Shah, tweeted: ‘OMG I just can’t! Nick Ferrari demanding to know why he isn’t classed as a person of colour, as he’s white, and white is a colour. 2022 continues to deliver!’

The PHD researcher on race, racism, and political representation at Kings College London later said on Twitter: ‘Nick Ferrari just tried to convince me that, as a white man, he is person of colour. How’s your morning going?’ 

Mr Ferrari said he had been a 'victim' of microaggressions as his surname, Ferrari, is unusual so he has been asked a number of times 'where are you from?'

Mr Ferrari said he had been a ‘victim’ of microaggressions as his surname, Ferrari, is unusual so he has been asked a number of times ‘where are you from?’

The NHS has been criticised for allowing the training on microaggressions which were said to be more damaging than ‘overt acts of hate’.

Institute of Economic Affairs’ Dr Kristian Niemietz told TalkTV: ‘This is the professionalisation of wokery. 

‘They used to show off and say they were more enlightened and better than you. 

‘It’s become an industry.’

Dr Niemietz said ‘microaggressions’ are the latest idea from the ‘woke industry’. 

Andy said on Twitter: ‘Millions of us are on NHS waiting lists and they are wasting time and our money looking for micro-aggressions.’

While another person said: ‘NHS workers were told microaggressions can be worse than “overt acts of hate” in a training course’

‘Not sure I would be able to keep my cool in one of those training sessions.’

NHS chiefs were told they could enroll for free in Ms Reid’s 15-minute talk that ‘asks us if we are living in space-age times with stone-age minds’ and ‘asks us to do three simple things to create social justice’.

The training was on the NHS Leadership Academy website, which said its ‘aim [was] to help everyone in the NHS discover their full leadership potential and achieve the highest standards in health and care’.

A spokesman for NHS England said: ‘This is not an NHS video and these online courses are not part of any required training.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk

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