Ohio teacher quits his job to become a manager at WALMART because it pays $12,000 more 

An Ohio man has gone viral after he quit his teaching job of nearly six years to become a manager at the local Walmart, where he will make more money.

Seth Goshorn, 28, posted a brief TikTok on July 18 holding up a Walmart vest like a professional athlete would hold up a new jersey, while wearing a blue polo shirt with the Walmart logo tucked into a gray pair of pants.

Text overlaying the video read, ‘Leaving teaching after six years to go be a manager at Walmart and make more not using my degree,’ and the caption read: ‘It’s not even close.’

The video has since been viewed more than 822,000 times, with people now reaching out to him for career advice.

Goshorn had worked in education for five and a half years as a second-grade teacher after previously working as a reading tutor in a lower-paying school district.

Last year, he told Good Morning America, he made $43,000 working in Ohio’s Stark County.

But as a stocking coach at the Walmart in Massillon, Ohio, Goshorn will be making $55,000 a year — before bonuses.

Seth Goshorn, 28, has gone viral after posting a TikTok of himself holding up his new Walmart uniform and saying he was leaving teaching to become a manager at the retail giant, where he would make more money

Goshorn said he made the decision to switch career paths because he hopes to eventually start a family with his fiancée, and believes Walmart would better provide him with the money he needs to do so.

When asked about the decision, he cited the big box chain’s compensation, saying: ‘It was a lot better than I think people are used to and what people would expect.’

He also said he saw more growth opportunity at Walmart, explaining: ‘You don’t have to go and get another degree, or more initials or letters in front of your name to move up.’

At the Charles L Warstler Elementary School, he told Good Morning America, he had to work overtime to make less money.

In addition to teaching second-grade, grading all of his students assignments and coming up with lesson plans, Goshorn said he also coached two sports teams for the school district and worked summer school sessions. 

‘I wouldn’t disparage anyone from becoming a teacher — it’s one of the most noble professions that you can do,’ Goshorn said, though he added: ‘Think about how good our teachers could be if they just focused on teaching and not having to work a second job on weekends.

‘They chose to be a teacher because they’re passionate about it,’ he said. ‘They didn’t choose to have to work a second job that comes along with it, and that’s the thing that I would have loved to see go away.’

Still, he told WJW: ‘I’ll be a lifelong teacher – that [will] always be part of my life, whether at Walmart or on social media.’

As a stocking coach at the Walmart in Massillon, Ohio, Goshorn will earn $55,000 a year before bonuses. He said he hopes to use that money to start a family with his fiancee

As a stocking coach at the Walmart in Massillon, Ohio, Goshorn will earn $55,000 a year before bonuses. He said he hopes to use that money to start a family with his fiancee

Goshorn had worked in education for five and a half years as a second-grade teacher after previously working as a reading tutor in a lower-paying school district. Last year, he made $43,000 working in Ohio's Stark County

Goshorn had worked in education for five and a half years as a second-grade teacher after previously working as a reading tutor in a lower-paying school district. Last year, he made $43,000 working in Ohio’s Stark County

Goshorn’s decision to take up employment at Walmart comes months after the company announced it was trying to increase its management.

In May, the retail giant announced it would launch a new careers program, which aims to give recent college graduates experience running stores and the chance to land a six-figure salary.

As part of the ‘College2Career’ program, employees will be partnered with store leaders and by the end, high performers will be offered a newly created management position of ’emerging coach’ – with a starting salary of $65,000. 

It can take as long as 10 years on average for an employee to progress from a salaried coach role to a store manager, Walmart said. 

But with College2Career, ‘we are aiming to move emerging coaches to store managers within two years,’ the company said noting that the average salary of Walmart store managers nationwide was $210,000 in 2021.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk

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