The paranoid life of feared Sydney underworld enforcer and bank robber Graham ‘Abo’ Henry

One of Sydney’s most feared violent thugs and career criminals is a haunted man, paranoid of being killed every day in a revealing and bizarre new interview.

Graham ‘Abo’ Henry was a self-confessed bank robber and notorious standover man who admits having shot and stabbed countless people in the 1970s and 1980s. 

 But now 70, with seven grandchildren, Henry still worries when he starts his car and nervously scans the number plate of every car in his street.

Henry is best-known as a key figure in a crime gang run by Neddy Smith, who was convicted of drug trafficking, theft, rape, armed robbery, and murder (Pictured Henry at left with Smith)

Henry, who has survived 20 attempts on his life, is still in fighting shape at 70

Henry, who has survived 20 attempts on his life, is still in fighting shape at 70

Henry is best-known as a key figure in a crime gang run by Neddy Smith, who was convicted of drug trafficking, theft, rape, armed robbery and murder.

Both were immortalised in the classic 1995 miniseries Blue Murder, though Henry is the last man standing – also the title of his latest book.

‘There’s none left in my gang, they’re all gone, either shot dead or died [from illness],’ he told The Felon Show in a wild hour-long interview.

Henry, who has spoken of having psychic abilities, still relies every day on ‘an awareness’ that has saved him from dying in 20 attempts on his life.

‘I still start my car with caution, I still look up and down the street everywhere I go and check out every number plate.’ 

Six of those attempts have come since Henry wrote his no-holds barred memoir in 2005, he said. 

It could explain why Henry still appears in fighting shape, and is shown landing impressive combinations on a heavy punching bag in a short video on the YouTube program. 

Henry is a father to three children and now has seven grandchildren (Pictured, Henry with his partner and baby during the 1970s)

Henry is a father to three children and now has seven grandchildren (Pictured, Henry with his partner and baby during the 1970s)

Henry claimed to have 'seen my own soul' while meditating in Goulburn jail and also confessed to having summoned the ghosts of his 'enemies' to sit at the end of his bed

Henry claimed to have ‘seen my own soul’ while meditating in Goulburn jail and also confessed to having summoned the ghosts of his ‘enemies’ to sit at the end of his bed

The strangest part of the interview came when Henry talked about supernatural abilities.

Henry claimed to have ‘seen my own soul’ while meditating in Goulburn jail and also confessed to having summoned the ghosts of his ‘enemies’ to sit at the end of his bed.

He claimed he can ‘call on them’ and after ‘a couple of weeks’ the spirits come to him.

The ghosts typically only hang around ‘fleetingly’ but they communicate with him in that time.

During the wide-ranging interview, an unapologetic Henry talked about his violent career and how it was preceded by an abusive childhood surrounded by a traumatised family. 

He claimed to have been sexually abused while locked up at the notorious Albion Street boys’ prison.

Known as the Metropolitan Boys Shelter it was connected to the Sydney children’s court in Surry Hills.

Henry has talked widely about his violent father, a World War II veteran and ‘brutal motherf***er’ who beat his one-legged mother.

He turned to crime before he was even a teenager and at 16 made a living as a pimp, organising prostitutes to work out of a van

He turned to crime before he was even a teenager and at 16 made a living as a pimp, organising prostitutes to work out of a van

His uncle came home from that war having been ‘castrated’ while being held in Japanese prisoner of war camp, Changi.

He fought his father and eventually ran away from home, sleeping rough and turned to fighting on the streets before becoming an accomplished boxer. 

Henry turned to crime before he was even a teenager and at 16 made a living as a pimp, organising prostitutes to work out of a van he drove around Sydney, charging clients every time an egg timer ran out.

He did his first armed robbery at 15 to see if he ‘had the nuts’ and claimed to have been a ‘prolific’ armed robber but said he’d never done jail for any of the heists.

Despite confessing to a life of crime, Henry said he’d only spent 14 years behind bars, with six years in 1991 being his longest stint.

Henry claimed to have been sexually abused while locked up at the notorious Albion Street boys' prison and said it was a major reason he became violent

Henry claimed to have been sexually abused while locked up at the notorious Albion Street boys’ prison and said it was a major reason he became violent

He managed to avoid jail terms for most of his violent offences because police corruption allowed him to ‘pay my way out’.

The only thing he regretted was his ‘silly rage’ that would build up inside leading him to shoot or stab victims ‘just on the spot’.

Henry believes his violent tendencies came from his upbringing at home and from the sexual abuse he suffered in the boys’ prison, even though he ‘blocked them out’.

He claimed to have been abused for up to eight days straight at Albion Street as a boy. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk

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