The UK starts grinding to a halt as unions plunge Britain into a £1bn ‘lockdown’

Union barons will force towns and cities into ‘lockdown’ and cost hospitality firms £1 billion this week, business leaders warned last night.

Britain’s railways will come to a grinding halt today after last-ditch talks failed to avert the biggest strikes for 30 years.

The militant RMT union was accused of ‘punishing millions of innocent people’ by pressing ahead with the walkouts, despite rail bosses offering workers a pay rise of at least 3 per cent – the same given last year to NHS staff who battled the Covid-19 crisis. 

The rail industry will also take a £150 million hit at a time when pre-pandemic passenger numbers are yet to return.

The walkouts will hinder millions trying to get to work, stop patients attending vital health appointments and inflict undue stress on students sitting exams.

Boris Johnson will condemn the strikes today ahead of a Cabinet meeting. He will say: ‘The unions are harming the very people they claim to be helping.

‘By going ahead with these rail strikes, they are driving away commuters who ultimately support the jobs of rail workers, while also impacting businesses and communities across the country.

‘Too-high demands on pay will also make it incredibly difficult to bring to an end the current challenges facing families around the world with rising costs of living.’

In other developments:

Mick Lynch, boss of the militant rail union RMT, has confirmed that walkouts will go ahead today, on Thursday and Saturday

Marta Kotlarak, 40, and husband Radek, 41 with Michael, 18, and Jacob, 16. Jacob has GCSE additional maths on Tuesday and Jacob A Level maths on Thursday. Marta having to cancel business appointments on both days

Marta Kotlarak, 40, and husband Radek, 41 with Michael, 18, and Jacob, 16. Jacob has GCSE additional maths on Tuesday and Jacob A Level maths on Thursday. Marta having to cancel business appointments on both days

More than half of the trains due to serve the Glastonbury Festival have been cancelled because of the rail strikes. Pictured: Festival-goers

More than half of the trains due to serve the Glastonbury Festival have been cancelled because of the rail strikes. Pictured: Festival-goers

The militant RMT union was accused of ¿punishing millions of innocent people¿ by pressing ahead with the walkouts this week

The militant RMT union was accused of ‘punishing millions of innocent people’ by pressing ahead with the walkouts this week

Passengers at London Waterloo station wait for their trains to arrive earlier today ahead of RMT union walkouts this week

Passengers at London Waterloo station wait for their trains to arrive earlier today ahead of RMT union walkouts this week

Trains in some areas of the UK have already been halted, with walkouts to begin tomorrow after after rail workers turned down a 3 per cent pay rise.

Trains in some areas of the UK have already been halted, with walkouts to begin tomorrow after after rail workers turned down a 3 per cent pay rise.

Commuters travel ahead of national rail strikes, when more than half of the UK's rail network will be suspended, at Vauxhall station in London earlier today

Commuters travel ahead of national rail strikes, when more than half of the UK’s rail network will be suspended, at Vauxhall station in London earlier today

Mick Lynch, general secretary of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union, at its headquarters in London this afternoon

Mick Lynch, general secretary of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union, at its headquarters in London this afternoon

LONDON LIVERPOOL STREET -- Passengers walk through London Liverpool Street today ahead of the rail strikes tomorrow

LONDON LIVERPOOL STREET — Passengers walk through London Liverpool Street today ahead of the rail strikes tomorrow

LONDON WATERLOO -- Commuters walk through London Waterloo station this morning ahead of the rail strikes tomorrow

LONDON WATERLOO — Commuters walk through London Waterloo station this morning ahead of the rail strikes tomorrow

GLASGOW QUEEN STREET -- Passengers travel through Glasgow Queen Street rail station today ahead of the planned strikes

GLASGOW QUEEN STREET — Passengers travel through Glasgow Queen Street rail station today ahead of the planned strikes

LONDON LIVERPOOL STREET -- Passengers walk through London Liverpool Street today ahead of the rail strikes tomorrow

LONDON LIVERPOOL STREET — Passengers walk through London Liverpool Street today ahead of the rail strikes tomorrow

MANCHESTER PICCADILLY -- A quiet Manchester Piccadilly railway station today ahead of the national rail strikes tomorrow

MANCHESTER PICCADILLY — A quiet Manchester Piccadilly railway station today ahead of the national rail strikes tomorrow

LONDON WATERLOO: Commuters walk through London Waterloo station this morning ahead of the rail strikes

LONDON WATERLOO: Commuters walk through London Waterloo station this morning ahead of the rail strikes

GLASGOW QUEEN STREET -- Passengers travel through Glasgow Queen Street rail station today ahead of the planned strikes

GLASGOW QUEEN STREET — Passengers travel through Glasgow Queen Street rail station today ahead of the planned strikes

MANCHESTER PICCADILLY -- A quiet Manchester Piccadilly railway station today ahead of the national rail strikes tomorrow

MANCHESTER PICCADILLY — A quiet Manchester Piccadilly railway station today ahead of the national rail strikes tomorrow

LONDON WATERLOO: Commuters walk through London Waterloo station this morning ahead of the rail strikes tomorrow

LONDON WATERLOO: Commuters walk through London Waterloo station this morning ahead of the rail strikes tomorrow

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps speaks to the media at College Green in Central London today ahead of the rail strike

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps speaks to the media at College Green in Central London today ahead of the rail strike

There had been hope of a breakthrough in the row over rail jobs and pay after sources close to the negotiations said there was ‘some movement’ from the RMT and ‘small steps of progress’ were being made. But it was dashed after union boss Mick Lynch confirmed walkouts will go ahead today, on Thursday and Saturday.

Network Rail officially offered the RMT a 2 per cent pay rise with ‘no strings attached’ and a further 1 per cent later in the year if certain efficiency targets were met.

It is understood the rise could have been as much as 5 per cent if the union was willing to accept further modernisation of working practices, such as technology being used more to detect potential faults on the network.

Intense negotiations continued last night, with a source suggesting a deal to avert Thursday’s and Saturday’s walkouts was still possible. They said: ‘It ain’t over until the fat lady sings. They wouldn’t be coming back, especially at this 11th hour, if we weren’t getting closer, and we are getting closer – it’s just not enough on either side yet to have a good enough package to avert the strikes at this point.’

The RMT is understood to want a pay increase of at least 7.1 per cent, and a guarantee of no compulsory redundancies.

Last night Mr Lynch did not rule out strikes going on for longer than the infamous Southern Rail dispute, which ended after 18 months in 2017, raising the prospect of similar walkouts for months. He said: ‘It will go on until somebody offers us a deal that we can accept and we can put to our members and they vote for it in a referendum.’

He dodged the question of whether it was fair for taxpayers to stump up the extra cash to fund the union’s pay demands, adding: ‘Faced with such an aggressive agenda of cuts to jobs, conditions, pay and pensions, the RMT has no choice but to defend our members industrially.’

But Transport Secretary Grant Shapps hit back, saying: ‘By carrying out this action, the RMT is punishing millions of innocent people, instead of calmly discussing the sensible and necessary reforms we need to make in order to protect our rail network.’  

A deserted Manchester Piccadilly Station this afternoon just hours before the nationwide rail strikes begin

A deserted Manchester Piccadilly Station this afternoon just hours before the nationwide rail strikes begin

there are some who are celebrating being to work from home for the week - and a tacit admission by some that they will be spending more time sunbathing than getting on with their jobs in the coming days.

there are some who are celebrating being to work from home for the week - and a tacit admission by some that they will be spending more time sunbathing than getting on with their jobs in the coming days.

there are some who are celebrating being to work from home for the week – and a tacit admission by some that they will be spending more time sunbathing than getting on with their jobs in the coming days.

there are some who are celebrating being to work from home for the week - and a tacit admission by some that they will be spending more time sunbathing than getting on with their jobs in the coming days.

there are some who are celebrating being to work from home for the week - and a tacit admission by some that they will be spending more time sunbathing than getting on with their jobs in the coming days.

There are some who are celebrating being to work from home for the week – and a tacit admission by some that they will be spending more time sunbathing than getting on with their jobs in the coming days.

Commuters at Waterloo Station today ahead of national rail strikes that begin tomorrow but have already began to hurt millions of commuters

Commuters at Waterloo Station today ahead of national rail strikes that begin tomorrow but have already began to hurt millions of commuters

Commuters arrive at Kings Cross station in London. Rail lines across Britain will be closed for three days, starting tomorrow

Commuters arrive at Kings Cross station in London. Rail lines across Britain will be closed for three days, starting tomorrow

Passengers board a train at Hunts Cross Station, Liverpool. MerseyRail has announced all trains will stop tomorrow due to industrial action.

Passengers board a train at Hunts Cross Station, Liverpool. MerseyRail has announced all trains will stop tomorrow due to industrial action.

TomTom traffic data revealed that congestion was up 11 per cent in London this morning compared to last Monday, with 350 traffic jams of more than 180 miles in length combined, as people took to their cars and vans to avoid disruption on public transport

TomTom traffic data revealed that congestion was up 11 per cent in London this morning compared to last Monday, with 350 traffic jams of more than 180 miles in length combined, as people took to their cars and vans to avoid disruption on public transport

The scale of strikes has not been seen for decades and are already set to last for months

The scale of strikes has not been seen for decades and are already set to last for months

Mick Lynch, Secretary-General of the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers speaks at a trades union organised protest march opposed to British government policies at Parliament Square in London on Saturday

Mick Lynch, Secretary-General of the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers speaks at a trades union organised protest march opposed to British government policies at Parliament Square in London on Saturday

He added: ‘We are now on the cusp of major disruption which will cause misery for people right across the country. Many people who do not get paid if they can’t get to work face losing money at a time they simply can’t afford to. Children sitting exams will face the extra distraction of changing their travel plans.

‘And vulnerable people trying to attend long-awaited hospital appointments may have no choice but to cancel.’

Ministers want the railways to make around £2 billion in savings after bailing out the industry to the tune of £16 billion during the pandemic – the equivalent of £600 per household. They also point out that the median salary for rail workers is already £44,000, well above the national average.

Business chiefs said the strikes ‘could not come at a worse time’ for firms hoping for a summer bounce following the damage caused by Covid.

Ros Morgan, chief executive of the Heart of London Business Alliance, said: ‘The rail and Tube strikes will impose another lockdown on the West End at a time when central London’s economy needs all the support it can get.’

Trade body UKHospitality warned the cost to the industry could top £1 billion this week alone as pubs, bars and restaurants are hit, along with other leisure and tourist activities such as theatres. Boss Kate Nicholls said: ‘The planned strike action couldn’t come at a worse time, and might deliver a fatal financial blow to those businesses already struggling to survive.’   

LONDON -- This Transport for London map shows greyed-out lines for those that will be affected by disruption fr

LONDON — This Transport for London map shows greyed-out lines for those that will be affected by disruption from tomorrow.  Only the Croydon Tramlink and Docklands Light Railway are shown as running normally

LNER: The operator says it will be running only 38 per cent of its usual trains, with the last from London to Edinburgh at 2pm

LNER: The operator says it will be running only 38 per cent of its usual trains, with the last from London to Edinburgh at 2pm

GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY -- A very limited services will run Cardiff or Plymouth to London via Bristol, Swindon and Reading

GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY — A very limited services will run Cardiff or Plymouth to London via Bristol, Swindon and Reading

SOUTH WESTERN RAILWAY: There will be no trains beyond Southampton to Weymouth; or beyond Basingstoke to Exeter

SOUTH WESTERN RAILWAY: There will be no trains beyond Southampton to Weymouth; or beyond Basingstoke to Exeter

SOUTHEASTERN - Limited services set to run between London, Kent and East Sussex next week on June 21, 23 and 25

SOUTHEASTERN – Limited services set to run between London, Kent and East Sussex next week on June 21, 23 and 25

GREAT NORTHERN, GATWICK EXPRESS, SOUTHERN AND THAMESLINK: This map from Govia Thameslink Railway shows the trains expected to operate on its network during strike action next week on June 21, 23 and 25 - a fraction of normal services

GREAT NORTHERN, GATWICK EXPRESS, SOUTHERN AND THAMESLINK: This map from Govia Thameslink Railway shows the trains expected to operate on its network during strike action next week on June 21, 23 and 25 – a fraction of normal services 

Unison members and members of the public take part in a TUC national demonstration in central London to demand action on the cost of living, a new deal for working people and a pay rise for all workers. Picture date: Saturday June 18, 2022

Unison members and members of the public take part in a TUC national demonstration in central London to demand action on the cost of living, a new deal for working people and a pay rise for all workers. Picture date: Saturday June 18, 2022

The boss of the British Beer and Pub Association, Emma McClarkin, said the strikes posed a ‘serious threat’ to the industry and could stop staff getting to work and customers being able to get to venues.

As Labour MPs said they would join striking workers, the unions reacted with fury at reports the party has banned its frontbenchers from picket lines.

A leaked memo from Sir Keir Starmer’s office said Shadow Cabinet members ‘should not be on picket lines’.

Sharon Graham, general secretary of Unite, said: ‘We expect Labour MPs to defend workers, by words and by actions. To instruct Labour MPs not to be on picket lines with workers speaks volumes. You don’t lead by hiding. No-one respects that. It’s time to decide whose side you are on. Workers or bad bosses?’

Around half of the rail network will be shut today, on Thursday and Saturday, with many rural areas completely cut off.

Overall, only one in five services will run as 40,000 RMT members for Network Rail and 13 train companies covering most of the country walk out.

Inter-city services, such as on the East Coast and West Coast main lines, could see service levels of up to 50 per cent. Due to the shift patterns of critical railway staff, such as signallers, only 60 to 70 per cent of services will run on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday due to the knock-on effects from strike days.   

What dates are the rail strikes taking place?

A national rail strike is planned by the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union for tomorrow (June 21), Thursday (June 23) and Saturday (June 25) which will affect the entire UK rail network. It is going ahead as it stands.

The action will involve members of the RMT at Network Rail and 13 operators. It will also have a knock-on effort on services on the three days after each strike day – Wednesday (June 22), Friday (June 24) and Sunday (June 26).

Separately, another strike is planned by the RMT and Unite on London Underground tomorrow (June 21) which will affect services until 8am on Wednesday (June 22). Most Underground services should be unaffected after then. 

There is also a strike by Aslef on Greater Anglia trains on Thursday (June 23) and Croydon Tramlink on June 28 and June 29, and on July 13 and July 14). An Aslef strike on Hull Trains on Sunday (June 26) has been called off.

Will any services will be affected tonight by the rail strike?

Most UK rail services will be running until the end of normal service this evening, although there are some exceptions and there could be last-minute disruption – so check with your operator before travelling tonight.

This afternoon’s 5.30pm Grand Central service from Sunderland to London Kings Cross is thought to be the first train cancelled due to this strike across the UK network. Also axed is tonight’s 7.50pm Caledonian Sleeper service from Fort William to London Euston. In addition, Heathrow Express has cancelled some trains tonight after 11pm.

Which UK operators are affected by the rail strike?

Just 20 per cent of normal services are expected to run on the three strike days. Every UK rail operator will be affected by the action, with most running a limited service between 7.30am and 6.30pm on these days. 

These operators running a limited service on the strike days are: Avanti West Coast, c2c, Chiltern Railways, CrossCountry, East Midlands Railway, Eurostar, Grand Central, Great Northern, Great Western Railway, Greater Anglia, Heathrow Express, Hull Trains, LNER, London Northwestern Railway, Lumo, Northern, ScotRail, South Western Railway, Southeastern, Southern, Stansted Express, Thameslink, TransPennine Express, Transport for Greater Manchester, Transport for Wales and West Midlands Railway.

Three operators say they will have no service on strike days – those being Gatwick Express, Caledonian Sleeper and Merseyrail. The only unaffected area is the Isle of Wight where the Island Line will run a normal service.

In London, the national rail strike means there will be a reduced service on the Overground and Elizabeth line on the three strike days. And the separate Tube strike tomorrow will likely cancel all Underground trains that day. 

Why is the rail strike taking place?

The strikes involve a row over pay, jobs and conditions. The RMT wants pay rises for workers that recognise the RPI rate of inflation, which is currently 11.1 per cent, and a guarantee of no compulsory redundancies.

The union has claimed that Network Rail plans to cut jobs and reduce spending – with an impact on safety. It says that it is striking ‘due to the inability of the rail employers to come to a negotiated settlement with RMT’. 

The RMT claims Network Rail and train operators have ‘subjected their staff to multi-year pay freezes and plan to cut thousands of jobs’, while also accusing the Government of ‘abjectly failing in their responsibilities’.

But Network Rail and the Government say the union is unwilling to modernise work practices. Despite a pay freeze in 2021 – during the height of the pandemic – Network Rail has offered a rise of at least 2 per cent for 2022.

The context of the dispute is that railway bosses are proposing to make efficiency savings, especially as fewer passengers are travelling by train because of the pandemic, which has led to more people working from home. 

The Government is not involved in negotiations. Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said it is up to the unions and employers to negotiate pay and conditions, but Labour and the unions believe he should be taking part in talks. 

How much do train drivers get paid?

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said last week that train drivers have a median salary of £59,000 – compared to a nurse at £31,000 and a care worker at £21,000. He said the median salary within the rail sector as a whole is £44,000. However the RMT says the median salary of a rail member in its union is £31,000 – the same as a nurse.

Are more rail strikes planned after this week? 

Yes, there is the prospect of further strike action affecting the school summer holidays – and further warnings of more walkouts for the rest of the year if no deal is reached between the unions, rail operators and Network Rail.

The Transport Salaried Staffs Association (TSSA) is balloting workers at Network Rail, Southeastern, Great Western Railway, CrossCountry, East Midlands Railway, West Midlands Trains, Avanti West Coast, Northern, LNER and c2c.

The Southeastern ballot closes on July 11 with the earliest possible action on July 25; while the Great Western Railway ends on July 12 before any action takes place from July 26. CrossCountry, East Midlands Railway and West Midlands Trains staff will be balloted for action until July 7, but no potential date for strike action has yet been set. 

Workers at c2c, LNER and Northern will be balloted until July 6, with the earliest potential date for strike action being July 20. The Avanti West Coast ballot began last Wednesday but no date for a walkout has been released.

In addition, RMT union boss Mick Lynch yesterday suggested the rail strikes could stretch into the autumn, warning: ‘There are going to be many unions balloting across the country, because people can’t take it anymore.’

Unite is balloting about 500 British Airways check-in staff at Heathrow Airport over a refusal to reverse a 10 per cent pandemic pay cut. If workers vote in favour, strikes are likely in July – potentially ruining summer holidays.

London Waterloo Underground station is closed during the Rail, Maritime and Transport's Underground strike on June 6

London Waterloo Underground station is closed during the Rail, Maritime and Transport’s Underground strike on June 6

Can you work from home this week during the rail strike?

Lauren Harkin, partner in the employment law team at RWK Goodman, told the publication People Management that employers should try to accommodate reasonable requests by staff trying to get into work during the strikes – including allowing them to come in late or leave early, and fund overnight accommodation if necessary.

She said: ‘Don’t unreasonably discipline employees who are genuinely unable to make it to work or who are late. There are no legal requirements about what businesses must do, but thinking outside the box will be a key consideration for critical staff in certain industries.’

And Alan Price, chief executive of BrightHR, said companies should speak with workers and agree alternative arrangements, adding: ‘Where this isn’t possible, there is the option of enforcing annual leave – with correct notice – or asking staff to use accrued time off in lieu.’

Downing Street has said employers should allow staff to work from home during the strikes if possible, but that it is up to individuals to decide whether they can get in. A spokesman said: ‘As during the pandemic, it obviously remains sensible for public and private-sector organisations to offer flexible working arrangements for some jobs.’

Train operators such as Govia Thameslink Railway – which manages Thameslink, Great Northern and Gatwick Express routes – have encouraged passengers to stay at home and only travel if ‘absolutely necessary’. A GTR spokesman said: ‘The pandemic has given people more options to work flexibly, which will help next week.’

Can I get a refund on my train ticket during the rail strike?

National Rail has confirmed that anyone who had booked a ticket for a service which has been cancelled, delayed or rescheduled will be entitled to a change or refund from the original retailer of their ticket.

If you have a ticket for travel on a strike day, you can use this ticket either on the day before the date on the ticket, or through and including the Monday and Tuesday of next week – excluding season tickets.

However, National Rail has warned of an exception in that if your ticket is for a journey that crosses London, it will not be valid on Underground services on an alternative date. Contact your ticket provider if this applies to you.

You may be able to use your ticket on another train company or an alternative route as disruption continues, with passengers advised to contact the train company they are due to travel with for more information.

Can season ticket holders get a refund for rail strike disruption?

Season ticket holders who choose not to travel on the three strike days can claim 100 per cent compensation for these days through the ‘Delay Repay’ scheme via the operator you were due to be travelling with.

​​​If you have purchased a season ticket but would like a full refund due to the strike action affecting your journey, you can apply for a refund from the original retailer of your ticket, but a fee of up to £10 could apply.

National Rail added: ‘Refunds are calculated from the date you return your season ticket to the original retailer and will be the difference between the price you paid, and the cost of any ticket or tickets for the period for which you have used your season ticket, up to and including the date you request a refund.’

How will the rail strike impact the economy? 

The Centre for Economics and Business Research consultancy has calculated that 0.8 per cent of staff in Britain – more than 250,000 people – will not be able to get to work tomorrow and therefore be unable to work. 

It estimates that the strikes are likely to cost the economy at least £91million in staff absences. Some £45.1million  of this will be tomorrow, because of the greater number of commuters then and the separate Tube strike. 

How will the rail strike impact Glastonbury and other events?

More than half of the trains due to serve the Glastonbury Festival have been cancelled because of the rail strikes – with tens of thousands of revellers set to be forced to find alternative routes to the site in Pilton, Somerset.

There will be just five services from London Paddington to Castle Cary on Thursday, with a total of 24 between Wednesday and Friday. Before the strike was announced, 51 trains were expected to run over the three-day period.

Great Western Railway told passengers: ‘We plan to maintain timetabled trains between Castle Cary and London Paddington throughout the course of the Glastonbury Festival. Some services might be subject to alterations to train times and we will be in contact with customers who have already booked seats on board those trains.’

National Express reported ‘a significant increase in both inquiries and bookings’ for people wanting to travel by coach instead. Most people travelling by rail to Glastonbury arrive at Castle Cary before catching a shuttle bus.

Other events affected this week include England’s cricketers playing their third Test match against New Zealand at Headingley in Leeds from June 23 to 27, and the UK Athletics Championships running from Friday in Manchester.

There will also be by-elections in Wakefield and in Tiverton and Honiton on Thursday, while Elton John and the Rolling Stones are playing BST Hyde Park gigs in London’s Hyde Park on Friday and Saturday respectively.  

Commuters queue for buses outside London Victoria train station during the most recent Underground strike on June 6

How will roads be affected by the rail strike?

Motorists are being warned to expect a surge in traffic as train passengers switch to road transport. The AA said that the worst affected roads are likely to be main motorway arteries, as well as rural and suburban areas.

Drivers in Scotland and Wales are expected to face long queues as most railway lines there will be closed during the industrial action tomorrow and on Thursday and Saturday. The M74, M8 and A9 in Scotland and the M4, A55, A5, and A483 in Wales could see severe traffic, according to the AA. 

An AA spokesman said: ‘Generally we predict a big increase in traffic in Scotland, Wales and major routes across the UK. The impact will be slightly cushioned by record fuel prices deterring some and more commuters deciding to work from home but congestion will still be a problem.’

How will the rail strike impact the NHS?

Thousands of Britons are likely to miss appointments or operations because they will be unable to get to hospitals and surgeries, while the walkouts will also cause problems for doctors, nurses and other staff travelling to work.

Professor Sir Stephen Powis, national medical director of NHS England, said it was ‘vital’ that people sought appointments and treatment despite the disruption, adding: ‘I am urging those who have appointments booked in to plan ahead and look at alternative options for getting to their GP practice or hospital if needed.’

The biggest concern is for hospitals in London because of the limited parking available for those who decide to drive in, and the Underground strike tomorrow making it even harder to travel. Both London Ambulance Service Trust and South Central Ambulance Service Foundation Trust are now on the highest level of alert.

How will schools be affected by the rail strike?

Families of pupils sitting exams this week have been advised to make alternative arrangements for getting to school during the rail strikes, which are expected to impact 17 GCSE and 22 A-level papers.

Tomorrow, pupils sitting GCSE history or dance with exam board AQA may be impacted by the strikes, while on Thursday those sitting GCSE physics papers could be affected. A-level pupils studying German, religious studies or maths with this board could be impacted by strike action tomorrow, while pupils sitting papers in A-level chemistry could experience disruptions to their journey to school on Thursday.

Headteachers have said families should look into alternative arrangements for getting their children to school to sit papers on time. Julie McCulloch, of the Association of School and College Leaders, said: ‘We are concerned about the potential impact on exam students of the industrial action affecting train services planned in June.

‘The majority of students live local to schools and colleges and tend to take buses rather than trains so we are hopeful that the impact will be minimal. However, it is important that families are conscious of the industrial action and make alternative arrangements where students are reliant on train services.’

Headteachers have been told to relocate A-level and GCSE papers if they cannot go ahead in the exam hall and that exams may begin up to half an hour later than scheduled to mitigate disruption.

What train services are running during the rail strike this week?

Avanti West Coast

Avanti West Coast, which runs on the West Coast Main Line, says it plans to have one train per hour from London Euston to each of Manchester, Liverpool, Birmingham and Preston, with a limited service onwards to Glasgow.

These trains will operate during limited hours, with the first train of the day departing Euston just before 8am and the last train of the day from Euston departing mid-afternoon. The days either side of industrial action are also likely to be affected – particularly in the mornings, because services will start later.

There will be no Avanti West Coast services to North Wales, Shrewsbury, Blackpool and Edinburgh on strike days. Trains will not call at Stockport, Macclesfield, Stoke-on-Trent or Runcorn, which will all be closed.

AVANTI WEST COAST: The operator plans to run one train per hour on strike days from London Euston to each of Manchester, Liverpool, Birmingham and Preston, with a limited service onwards to Glasgow. The last trains will leave Euston mid-afternoon. There will be no Avanti West Coast services to North Wales, Shrewsbury, Blackpool and Edinburgh on strike days

AVANTI WEST COAST: The operator plans to run one train per hour on strike days from London Euston to each of Manchester, Liverpool, Birmingham and Preston, with a limited service onwards to Glasgow. The last trains will leave Euston mid-afternoon. There will be no Avanti West Coast services to North Wales, Shrewsbury, Blackpool and Edinburgh on strike days

c2c 

On the c2c route, which runs between London and Essex, the operator will be running a reduced service from 7.30am to 6.30pm, equating to less than a third of normal service levels. This will consist of:

The operator added that the days surrounding the strike action dates will also see disruption across its network, with ‘services set to start running from around 6.30am with a full service planned to be in operation by 8am’. 

c2c: The operator providing services for Essex will run two trains per hour from Fenchurch Street to Shoeburyness via Laindon; two trains per hour from Fenchurch Street to Pitsea via Rainham; and no trains via Ockendon or Chafford Hundred

c2c: The operator providing services for Essex will run two trains per hour from Fenchurch Street to Shoeburyness via Laindon; two trains per hour from Fenchurch Street to Pitsea via Rainham; and no trains via Ockendon or Chafford Hundred

Caledonian Sleeper

All services on the overnight Caledonian Sleeper have been cancelled from today until Friday. The 7.50pm service tonight from Fort William to London Euston is the first of the operator’s trains to be cancelled by the strike. 

CALEDONIAN SLEEPER: All services on the overnight Caledonian Sleeper have been cancelled from today until Friday

CALEDONIAN SLEEPER: All services on the overnight Caledonian Sleeper have been cancelled from today until Friday

Chiltern Railways

Chiltern Railways will run a ‘very significantly reduced timetable’ from Tuesday until Saturday, and services will finish earlier tonight and start later on Sunday. In addition, services will be unable to call at stations operated by London Underground on Tuesday due to the separate Tube strike.

The service will be extremely limited, with the following service pattern from Tuesday to Saturday:

There will be no Chiltern services north of Banbury, between Amersham and London on the Metropolitan line, or to Oxford, between Tuesday and Saturday. 

Services that do run will start much later and finish much earlier than normal. The service will start from around 7.30am, with morning trains not arriving in London until after 9am. In the afternoon, the last trains will be much earlier than normal, with the last trains from Marylebone running at the following times:

CHILTERN RAILWAYS: The service will be extremely limited on the strike days, with the following pattern expected

CHILTERN RAILWAYS: The service will be extremely limited on the strike days, with the following pattern expected

CrossCountry

CrossCountry will run a significantly reduced service on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Days either side of the industrial action are also expected to be affected. Here are the route details for the three strike days:

CROSSCOUNTRY: The network will be running a 'significantly reduced service' on the strike days next week as shown above

CROSSCOUNTRY: The network will be running a ‘significantly reduced service’ on the strike days next week as shown above

East Midlands Railway

East Midlands Railway will be operating a significantly reduced service on the three strike days and also warned customers to ‘expect some disruption’ to advertised service levels on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday. 

Here is the planned timetable on strike days – with the limited services only running from 7.30am to 6.30pm:

All other lines of the route will be closed and bus replacement services will not be provided. 

In addition, on Saturday and Sunday there will be no direct trains between Luton and London St Pancras due to pre-planned engineering work – which is unrelated to strike action. 

EAST MIDLANDS RAILWAY: The operator will run one train per hour between Nottingham and London, Sheffield and London, Corby and London, Derby and Matlock, Derby and Nottingham, Leicester and Nottingham and Nottingham and Sheffield

EAST MIDLANDS RAILWAY: The operator will run one train per hour between Nottingham and London, Sheffield and London, Corby and London, Derby and Matlock, Derby and Nottingham, Leicester and Nottingham and Nottingham and Sheffield

Eurostar 

Eurostar has cancelled up to four daily services from London St Pancras to Paris Gare du Nord; five from Paris to London; two from London to Brussels Midi; three from Brussels to London, two from London to Amsterdam Centraal and two from Amsterdam to London on all three strike days of Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. 

There will also be one London to Paris and one Paris to London train axed on Wednesday and Friday. Eurostar has also warned passengers that connecting journeys to London St Pancras may be affected by the strike action.

EUROSTAR: Services on Eurostar to France, Belgium and the Netherlands will all be affected by strike action this week

EUROSTAR: Services on Eurostar to France, Belgium and the Netherlands will all be affected by strike action this week

Gatwick Express

Gatwick Express services will not run on Tuesday, Thursday or Saturday due to the strike action. On Wednesday and Friday, services will also be severely disrupted and be running on an amended Sunday timetable from 7.15am.

Grand Central 

Grand Central plan to run a reduced service on its routes from London to and from Sunderland and Bradford on all three strike days. Trains will run on the North East route to and from Eaglescliffe only, and on the West Yorkshire route to and from Wakefield only. Customers without reservations on these days will not be permitted to board. 

There will also be an impact on services outside of strike days, with today’s 5.30pm service from Sunderland to London Kings Cross thought to be the first train cancelled due to the strike across the UK network. There will also be amendments to the timetable on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday. Timetables for strike days are pictured below:

GRAND CENTRAL: Trains will run to and from Eaglescliffe only, and to and from Wakefield only, with an amended timetable

GRAND CENTRAL: Trains will run to and from Eaglescliffe only, and to and from Wakefield only, with an amended timetable

Great Western Railway

Great Western Railway says it expects rail services to be ‘severely affected’ from Tuesday to Saturday, and a significantly reduced temporary timetable will be in place. On strike days, an extremely limited service will operate between 7.30am and 6.30pm. On non-strike days this week, no services will run before 7am.

Very limited services will run between Cardiff Central and London Paddington. Services on that line will also run to and from Oxford and to and from Basingstoke. Very limited services will also run between London and Exeter St Davids, through Bristol, and on to Plymouth. No rail services will be able to operate on strike days on these routes:

GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY: On strike days, a limited service will operate between 7.30am and 6.30pm on the green routes

GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY: On strike days, a limited service will operate between 7.30am and 6.30pm on the green routes

Greater Anglia 

Greater Anglia said no regional or branch line trains will run on strike days and a very limited service will operate elsewhere – but only between 7.30am and 6.30pm – when all trains must have arrived at their final destination. 

The operator is being affected both by the RMT strike on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday – and an Aslef strike on Thursday. There will be no services running on the following routes on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday:

A very limited and much reduced service – with fewer trains running and so fewer seats available – will run starting at 7.30am and finishing at 6.30pm on the following routes: 

GREATER ANGLIA: The normal route map for Greater Anglia is pictured. The network will be running a much-reduced service

GREATER ANGLIA: The normal route map for Greater Anglia is pictured. The network will be running a much-reduced service

Heathrow Express 

Heathrow Express services will be significantly affected from tonight – when services will be cancelled after 11pm – until Saturday. Here is the plan for a a half-hourly service operating during the three strike days: 

Hull Trains

Hull Trains will be operating a ‘significantly reduced timetable’ on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday, when they will only be running between Doncaster and London King’s Cross and only between 7.30am and 6.30pm.

Services on days either side of the strike dates will also be affected. However, a separate planned Aslef strike on Sunday has now been called off, so services that day are now due to run as normal.

HULL TRAINS: The operator will only be running between Doncaster and London King¿s Cross on the three strike days

HULL TRAINS: The operator will only be running between Doncaster and London King’s Cross on the three strike days

LNER

LNER says over the strike dates it will be running around 38 per cent of its usual trains and they are likely to be very busy. The operator will run limited services between London King’s Cross and Edinburgh Waveley. 

There will be no LNER services to Aberdeen, Inverness and Glasgow Central. There will also be no services to branch lines of Bradford, Skipton, Harrowgate or Lincoln, Hull, Middlesbrough and Sunderland.  

LNER: The operator says it will be running only 38 per cent of its usual trains, with the last from London to Edinburgh at 2pm

LNER: The operator says it will be running only 38 per cent of its usual trains, with the last from London to Edinburgh at 2pm

London Northwestern Railway

London Northwestern Railway expects the strike action to have a ‘considerable impact on the trains we are able to run’, which will only be between 7.30am and 6.30pm on strike days. There will also be a reduced timetable on Wednesday and Friday. Here are the details for strike days:

LONDON NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY: The strike will have a significant impact on travel. Normal services are shown above

LONDON NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY: The strike will have a significant impact on travel. Normal services are shown above

Lumo

Lumo – which also runs trains between London King’s Cross and Edinburgh – said it will operate as many trains as possible, although there will be ‘some disruption’ between today and Sunday. Here is the plan for strike days:

Merseyrail

There will be no Merseyrail train services on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, and there will also be knock on effects on the day after each industrial action date. On Wednesday and Friday, limited rail replacement buses will run until 7am, from which time trains will be reintroduced from 07:00.

MERSEYRAIL: There will be no Merseyrail train services on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. The normal route map is shown

MERSEYRAIL: There will be no Merseyrail train services on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. The normal route map is shown

Northern 

Northern says on strike days there will be ‘extremely limited availability of both train crew and signalling staff’ and as such they ‘will not be able to operate services on most routes’. There will be no replacement buses.

Northern say these services will still run, on the three strike days. All other Northern services will NOT run: 

NORTHERN RAIL: Only a fraction of the Northern Rail network will run on strike days. The full normal route map is pictured

NORTHERN RAIL: Only a fraction of the Northern Rail network will run on strike days. The full normal route map is pictured

ScotRail 

Just five ScotRail routes will operate in Scotland on strike days. A very limited number of trains will run in the central belt between 7.30am and 6.30pm on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. The rail operator has warned passengers only to travel ‘if they really need to’ on the limited services that are running, which are as follows:

Edinburgh to Glasgow via Falkirk High: Two trains per hour

Edinburgh to Bathgate: Two trains per hour

Glasgow to Hamilton/Larkhall: Two trains per hour

Glasgow to Lanark: Two trains per hour

Edinburgh to Glasgow via Shotts: One train per hour

SCOTRAIL: This map shows the normal network run by ScotRail. Only five lines will be able to run on strike days

SCOTRAIL: This map shows the normal network run by ScotRail. Only five lines will be able to run on strike days

Southern

Southern staff are not on strike, but the national walkout will severely affect all journeys on the network between Tuesday and Sunday. Southern say it will operate on limited opening hours, with services starting later and finishing much earlier than usual. On strike days, the last trains will finish late afternoon. Here is what is running: 

Services between London Bridge / London Victoria and South coast:

Services between London Bridge / London Victoria and South London:

GREAT NORTHERN, GATWICK EXPRESS, SOUTHERN AND THAMESLINK: This map from Govia Thameslink Railway shows the trains expected to operate on its network during strike action next week on June 21, 23 and 25 - a fraction of normal services

GREAT NORTHERN, GATWICK EXPRESS, SOUTHERN AND THAMESLINK: This map from Govia Thameslink Railway shows the trains expected to operate on its network during strike action next week on June 21, 23 and 25 – a fraction of normal services 

South Western Railway  

More than 2,100 South Western Railway staff are staking part in strike action along with Network Rail signallers, meaning it will run a dramatically reduced timetable on strike days with significant parts of the network closed.

A late-starting Sunday level of service will operate across the network on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday, and customers are urged only to travel by rail if ‘absolutely necessary’ between Tuesday and Sunday.

A severely limited service will run between 7.15am and 6.30pm on some routes on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, with the rest of the network closed. On these strike days, SWR will run: 

SOUTH WESTERN RAILWAY: There will be no trains beyond Southampton to Weymouth; or beyond Basingstoke to Exeter

SOUTH WESTERN RAILWAY: There will be no trains beyond Southampton to Weymouth; or beyond Basingstoke to Exeter

Southeastern

Southeastern are warning customers to expect ‘significant disruption’ across the network. Only 35 out of its 180 stations will be open, and no rail replacement buses will serve stations which are closed.

Passengers have been warned they ‘may be unable to board trains at stations where a limited service is running, especially at locations such as Ashford and Ebbsfleet‘. Southeastern also said the last trains back from London will be ‘much earlier than usual, so there is a risk that not everyone will be able to make their return journey’.

Services in between strike days are expected to be ‘severely disrupted’, especially in the mornings until midday. No services will run before 7.30am. The operator also said services will also be affected on the days following the industrial action, particularly in the mornings.

Southeastern will continue to run its three Dartford lines, with a delayed service, between Dartford and London Bridge. That includes the route via Bexleyheath, the line via Sidcup and the line via Woolwich. Southeastern will also run its High Speed via Ashford and London St Pancras, as well as its Orpington line to London Bridge.

SOUTHEASTERN - Limited services set to run between London, Kent and East Sussex next week on June 21, 23 and 25

SOUTHEASTERN – Limited services set to run between London, Kent and East Sussex next week on June 21, 23 and 25

Stansted Express 

Stansted Express is advising people to only travel if ‘absolutely necessary’ and are warning customers to expect severe disruption.

Services running will only operate from 7.30am. There will be two trains an hour, but this will reduce to one an hour on Thursday, when train drivers who are part of the Aslef union are also on strike – in addition to the RMT.

The 24-hour strikes will also have a knock-on effect on services on days immediately before and after the days when industrial action is taking place, so customers are advised to check before they travel this week.

Thameslink and Great Northern

Many stations and routes will be closed across the Thameslink and Great Northern network, and trains will only be able to run during limited hours from around 7.15am and will finish in the late afternoon. There will be no alternative travel options after the last trains. 

Services between St Pancras International and Bedford:

Services between King’s Cross and Peterborough / Cambridge / Ely:

Transport for London

Along with the national strikes, London-wide strikes affecting the Underground will take place on Tuesday and affect services until mid-morning on Wednesday. The national strike will also affect the Elizabeth line and London Overground services, and some Tube services, on strike days and until mid-morning on the days after strikes.

London Underground 

Night Tube

London Overground 

Elizabeth line 

DLR (Docklands Light Railway)

London Buses 

Croydon Tramlink 

Emirates Airline Cable Car 

Santander Cycles 

LONDON -- This Transport for London map shows greyed-out lines for those that will be affected by disruption on Tuesday all day, and Wednesday morning. 'Severe disruption or no service' is expected on all Tube lines from the start of Tuesday until at least 8am on Wednesday. Only the Croydon Tramlink and Docklands Light Railway are shown as running normally

LONDON — This Transport for London map shows greyed-out lines for those that will be affected by disruption on Tuesday all day, and Wednesday morning. ‘Severe disruption or no service’ is expected on all Tube lines from the start of Tuesday until at least 8am on Wednesday. Only the Croydon Tramlink and Docklands Light Railway are shown as running normally

TransPenine Express 

TransPennine Express (TPE) will be operating a very limited service on these routes from Tuesday until Saturday: 

Services will not run between:

These stations will be completely closed with no services calling there on strike days:

TRANSPENNINE EXPRESS: The network will be operating a very limited service on the above routes on strike days this week

TRANSPENNINE EXPRESS: The network will be operating a very limited service on the above routes on strike days this week

Transport for Greater Manchester

All tram lines will run to their usual frequency and times, except the Altrincham to Timperley route which will only be from 7am to 7pm on the three strike dates, and at a 12-minute frequency. Services will operate as follows: 

TRANSPORT FOR GREATER MANCHESTER: All tram lines will run as usual this week, except the Altrincham to Timperley line

TRANSPORT FOR GREATER MANCHESTER: All tram lines will run as usual this week, except the Altrincham to Timperley line

Transport for Wales

Transport for Wales is advising customers not to travel by train on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, with the majority of its rail services suspended. The only services running will be:

TRANSPORT FOR WALES: Almost the entire Transport for Wales network (shown above) will be closed during the strike days

TRANSPORT FOR WALES: Almost the entire Transport for Wales network (shown above) will be closed during the strike days

West Midlands Railway 

West Midlands Railway say the strike will have ‘considerable impact on the number of trains we are able to run’.  The operator will be running a very limited service on the strike dates between 7.30am and 6.30pm only. A very limited service will also be running on Wednesday and Friday. The updated timetable is as follows:

WEST MIDLANDS RAILWAY: The operator says the strike will have 'considerable impact'. Its normal route map is shown above

WEST MIDLANDS RAILWAY: The operator says the strike will have ‘considerable impact’. Its normal route map is shown above

Will teachers go on strike this year?

Teachers could also go on strike later this year, with two key teaching unions are considering balloting members over industrial action if a significant pay increase is not offered.

The National Education Union said a letter will be sent to Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi on Wednesday saying the union is prepared to ballot its members if a pay rise more in line with inflation is not offered.

However, a ballot will not be called until Mr Zahawi responds to the conclusions of the School Teachers’ Review Body report, which is expected to be released at the end of the school year. The union said an initial indicative ballot would be taken, followed by a formal ballot if the first result suggests members support strike action.

NASUWT leaders have also called for a 12 per cent pay rise for teachers this year, and said it will ballot members in England, Wales and Scotland for a strike if its demands are not met. A pay award for 2022/23 is due in November.

Will doctors or nurses strike?

Junior doctors and nurses are among the NHS staff who could strike. They have claimed their pay has declined by 22 per cent in real terms since 2009 and are demanding a significant pay rise.

The British Medical Association, a union for UK doctors with 160,000 members, has plans to ballot for industrial action by early next year if the dispute over junior doctors’ pay is not resolved.

The Royal College of Nursing, which has 500,000 members, is demanding a pay rise for nurses of five percentage points above inflation. This would result in a 16.1 per cent increase on current numbers, which compares with the Government’s aim to cap pay increases at 3 per cent. Nurses could also strike if their demands are not met.

Could local government workers and civil servants go on strike?

The Public and Commercial Services Union, which represents civil service workers, will hold a ballot in September over pay, pensions and redundancies amid plans for possible industrial action.

Representatives have warned that delays in issuing passports and driving licences will get worse if staff numbers are cut – and that they could strike in response to Boris Johnson’s planned 91,000 civil service job cuts.

Meanwhile the Unison, GMB and Unite unions have said local government staff in England, Wales and Northern Ireland should receive a pay increase of at least £2,000 each. Workers include rubbish collectors, library staff, teaching assistants and care workers. Unite said it will support ‘any action’ by workers to achieve a pay rise.

In addition, the Communication Workers Union will ballot Royal Mail workers over a pay rise offer of 2 per cent. It has also sent ballot papers to BT workers including engineers, contact centre staff and retail employees over pay. 

Why have barristers now decided to go on strike?

Barristers have voted to go on strike in a row over legal aid funding. The Criminal Bar Association (CBA), which represents barristers in England and Wales, said several days of court walkouts will begin from next week.

The promised industrial action, announced today following a ballot of members, comes at a time of significant backlogs across the court system. The CBA said around 81.5 per cent of the more than 2,000 members to respond supported industrial action.

The strike action is intended to last for four weeks, beginning with walkouts on Monday June 27 and Tuesday June 28, increasing by one day each week until a five-day strike from Monday July 18 to Friday July 22.

It means that cases at which barristers are required are likely to have to be postponed, including crown court trials. Barristers are expected to stage picket lines outside court, including at the Old Bailey in London and at crown courts in Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Leeds and Manchester.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk

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