Underworld killer called ‘Cross’ seeks leniency over attack after sister dies from Covid, Melbourne

Feared underworld trigger man George Marrogi spat in the face of a prison guard during a cowardly attack behind bars at the height of the Covid-19 pandemic. 

Knowns as ‘Cross’, Marrogi was sentenced for murder in the Supreme Court of Victoria in April to a total of 32 years in jail – all of which he is likely to serve behind bars. 

On Wednesday, Marrogi appeared once again in a Melbourne court, this time via video link from the Metropolitan Remand Centre. 

Dressed in prison greens, Marrogi has spent most of his rotten life caged within Victoria’s toughest prison – Barwon – where he carried out his vile attack in July last year. 

George Marrogi, 33, was sentenced in April to 32 years in jail over the murder of Kevin Ors

George Marrogi (pictured in prison greens) has spent much of his short life behind bars

George Marrogi (pictured in prison greens) has spent much of his short life behind bars

WHO IS GEORGE MARROGI?  

Jail has been Marrogi’s home now for nearly more years that he has been free. 

By 2004, an out-of-control Marrogi was charged by police with 14 separate incidents. 

The following year he was charged with an armed robbery and released from juvenile detention on bail. 

Armed with a knife, Marrogi, aged just 16, stabbed and killed one youth and seriously injured another. 

He stood trial for murder, but was convicted of manslaughter and intentionally causing serious injury. 

Aged just months under 18, Marrogi copped a nine-and-a-half year sentence, but served a little over six. 

While on parole in 2013, Marrogi was convicted of recklessly causing serious injury and jailed again for another year. 

The following year he was convicted of arson and had more time added to his tally. 

On September 27, 2016, homicide squad detectives arrested Marrogi over the execution-style murder of Ors.

The court heard Marrogi had been in jail on remand over the 2016 murder of drug dealer Kadir Ors when he spat in the face of his unsuspecting victim. 

Ors had been riddled with bullets in an execution-style hit by Marrogi under broad daylight.

A police prosecutor said Marrogi had been asked to leave Barwon’s prison phone room when he lashed out at his victim. 

Last month, it was revealed the ruthless killer had allegedly been busy maintaining control of his gang – Notorious Crime Family – from behind bars using a prison phone.

The court heard an angry Marrogi lured the prison guard over to an open trap in the door before spitting in his face. 

The attack was captured on CCTV. 

The next day, as the same guard worked to remove the troublesome inmate from his cell, Marrogi lashed out again, this time with his leg. 

Secured by handcuffs, CCTV captured Marrogi take a sidekick at the guard, striking him in the stomach as he moved to defend himself. 

In true Marrogi-style, the court heard he refused to be interviewed over the attack. 

His lawyer, Daniel Georgiou, claimed Marrogi’s spit had hardly been on target. 

‘We’re certainly not diminishing the seriousness of a spitting incident, but it appears from the CCTV footage that the officer doesn’t recoil in disgust or immediately wipe his face,’ he said. 

Mr Georgiou claimed it was unknown how much spit had actually landed on the guard’s face. 

‘We’re not saying in any event it’s justified, and we’re not trying to justify it,’ he said.  

George Marrogi in happier times. He will spend most of his life behind bars

George Marrogi in happier times. He will spend most of his life behind bars 

George Marrogi's sister Meshilin had been with him during a shopping trip to purchase clothes he would wear in the Ors murder. She died tragically from Covid-19 last year. Marrogi was not allowed to attend her funeral because he was in jail

George Marrogi’s sister Meshilin had been with him during a shopping trip to purchase clothes he would wear in the Ors murder. She died tragically from Covid-19 last year. Marrogi was not allowed to attend her funeral because he was in jail

In pleading for mercy, Mr Georgiou said Marrogi had struggled over the death of his sister Meshilin Marrogi, who died last year from complications related to Covid-19.

‘He was unable to attend the funeral due to being in custody,’ Mr Georgiou said. 

The court heard Marrogi’s 32-year sentence was also said to be causing the killer some anxiety. 

Mr Georgiou said his client had spent the majority of his time behind bars since his arrest in ‘Super Max’ custody – meaning hard time. 

Again the court was outlined Marrogi’s unfortunate childhood, which saw him flee from Iraq to Australia in 1996 – the year the United States’ ‘Desert Strike’ swung into gear with a massive missile attack. 

Upon arriving in Melbourne, a young Marrogi hardly knew a word of English and the kids from St Thomas Moore Primary, in Melbourne’s north, bullied him mercilessly. 

When his parents separated in his final year of primary school, Marrogi’s road upon the dark path was set in stone. 

In sentencing Marrogi to three months in jail, to be served concurrently with his existing sentence, Magistrate Peter Mellas said he had shown the career crook leniency due to his guilty plea. 

The court heard like-minded inmates usually like to waste the court’s time by pleading not guilty to obvious prison guard attacks. 

George Marrogi (pictured with sister Meshilin) missed his sister's funeral last year after a judge refused his request to attend

George Marrogi (pictured with sister Meshilin) missed his sister’s funeral last year after a judge refused his request to attend

Marrogi attacked a guard inside Barwon prison (pictured)

Marrogi attacked a guard inside Barwon prison (pictured) 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk

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