Mark Schwarzer says Andrew Redmayne’s tactics could be the new normal ahead of Qatar World Cup

Legendary Socceroos goalkeeper Mark Schwarzer says national hero Andrew Redmayne’s bizarre tactics could become the NEW NORMAL ahead of Qatar World Cup

Australian goalkeeping great Mark Schwarzer predicts Andrew Redmayne’s unorthodox style may become a standard part of a ‘keeper’s repertoire after his antics secured Australia’s passage to the World Cup. 

With everything on the line, Socceroos coach Graham Arnold benched captain and regular custodian Mat Ryan and instead played a 33-year-old A-League player with the nickname The Grey Wiggle.

The rest, as they say, is history. Redmayne danced in goal to distract his opposition. 

He located his rival goalkeeper’s water bottle complete with notes on the Aussies and tossed it over the fence. 

He saved a crucial penalty strike to secure our passage into a fifth-consecutive World Cup. 

Redmayne performs his unique dancing routine in goal to distract the Peru goal shooters

Seeya later mate: Redmayne tosses away his rival's water bottle and notes on the Aussies

Seeya later mate: Redmayne tosses away his rival’s water bottle and notes on the Aussies

The diving block that would ultimately the win for Australia and a World Cup berth at Qatar

The diving block that would ultimately the win for Australia and a World Cup berth at Qatar

Schwarzer was the man in the net in 2006 in the famous penalty shootout against Uruguay that saw Australia return to the World Cup finals for the first time in 32 years.

He made two crucial saves that night. While Schwarzer didn’t use any of the tactics Redmayne has become famous for, the former Middlesbrough and Fulham goalkeeper said he would not be shocked if they caught on. 

‘Obviously it was unorthodox. We’ve not seen it before you,’ Schwarzer said on Optus Sport.

‘There are comparisons to [former Liverpool goalkeeper] Bruce Grobbelaar, [Jerzy] Dudek in the [2005] final of the Champions League for Liverpool.’

‘You know what a lot of goalkeeping coaches are like, they look for an extra a little bit of advantage,’ Schwarzer said.

‘I wouldn’t be surprised if that were to happen moving forward. It could be a game changer.

‘It could be certainly a trendsetter.’

Schwarzer of the Socceroos makes a save in the penalty shoot-out during the second leg of the 2006 FIFA World Cup qualifying match between Australia and Uruguay

Schwarzer of the Socceroos makes a save in the penalty shoot-out during the second leg of the 2006 FIFA World Cup qualifying match between Australia and Uruguay

The tactics might have been a shock for those watching, but inside the Socceroos walls the plan had been months in the making – including swiping the Peru goalkeeper’s water bottle.

‘It was discussed weeks prior,’ Redmayne said.

‘We were talking about ways of getting messages across or what not, we did say if it were coming down to a penalty shootout, I would have a water bottle because that was our plan A.

‘But if they (the opposition) had a water bottle that was beside the goal or in my little area, that it would be picked up and tossed into the crowd because it’s a do-or-die moment, it’s us against them.

‘I’ve said to a few people it goes against every moral fibre in my body to be that kind of person and that kind of antagonist.’

Andrew Redmayne of Australia celebrates with teammates after saving a penalty in the shootout, resulting in the Socceroos qualifying for the 2022 FIFA World Cup

Andrew Redmayne of Australia celebrates with teammates after saving a penalty in the shootout, resulting in the Socceroos qualifying for the 2022 FIFA World Cup

As for the Socceroos hopes in Qatar, Schwarzer said fans should temper their expectations because France and Denmark are actually better teams than the ones Australia faced four years ago. 

‘I don’t think anyone can kid themselves how difficult this World Cup’s is going to be for the Socceroos, playing in France and Denmark as they did four years earlier,’ Schwarzer said.

‘I think both sides have better sides today than they were back then.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk

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